History, Art, Humanity and Literature

Really...is there anything else?

What wretched poverty of language! To compare stars to diamonds!

—Gustave Flaubert (via observando)

blastedheath:


Damián González (Cuban, b. 1967), La Puerta, 2010. Oil on canvas, 27½ x 41 in.

blastedheath:

Damián González (Cuban, b. 1967), La Puerta, 2010. Oil on canvas, 27½ x 41 in.

(via oldpainting)

aseaofquotes:

Haruki Murakami, “Concerning the Sound of a Train Whistle in the Night or On the Efficacy of Fiction”

antique-erotic:

Utterly charming, this paper moon photograph likely dates to the latter years of the 19th century - one fellow enjoys a bottled beer while the other kindly donates his drink to the man in the moon (hopefully in gesture only, with an empty bottle; otherwise he just made a frightful mess of his jacket behind the painted cut-out!)

antique-erotic:

Utterly charming, this paper moon photograph likely dates to the latter years of the 19th century - one fellow enjoys a bottled beer while the other kindly donates his drink to the man in the moon (hopefully in gesture only, with an empty bottle; otherwise he just made a frightful mess of his jacket behind the painted cut-out!)

(Source: dickensian-dandy)

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo
[x], [x], [x], [x]
Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)
As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.
She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.
After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.
So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.
Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo

[x], [x], [x], [x]

Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)

As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.

She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.

After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.

So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.

Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

This poetry. I never know what I’m going to say.
I don’t plan it.
When I’m outside the saying of it,
I get very quiet and rarely speak at all.

—Rumi, The Essential Rumi (via observando)

Every word was once a poem.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson (via observando)

Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

—H.L. Mencken (via observando)