History, Art, Humanity and Literature

Really...is there anything else?

Why do people have to be this lonely? What’s the point of it all? Millions of people in this world, all of them yearning, looking to others to satisfy them, yet isolating themselves. Why? Was the earth put here just to nourish human loneliness?

—Haruki Murakami (via leslieseuffert)

(via leslieseuffert)

centuriespast:

Autumn Evening
by Henry Mark Anthony
Oil on canvas, 78.5 x 104 cm
Collection: Wolverhampton Arts and Heritage

centuriespast:

Autumn Evening

by Henry Mark Anthony

Oil on canvas, 78.5 x 104 cm

Collection: Wolverhampton Arts and Heritage

Too much happiness always overflowed into tears of sorrow.

—Amy Tan (via observando)

centuriespast:

CONSTABLE, JohnThe Hay-Wain1821Oil on canvas, 130 x 185 cmNational Gallery, London

centuriespast:

CONSTABLE, John
The Hay-Wain
1821
Oil on canvas, 130 x 185 cm
National Gallery, London

ornamentedbeing:

I’m sure someone will reblog this and be negative about it but I don’t really care. My mother is a strong woman and I am proud to take after her. She raised me to be very independent and it’s one of the reasons I was able to say farewell to my home and move to London alone. I have always known that if I was ever trapped in a tower I wouldn’t need a prince to rescue me, I can save myself.
That said I hope that one day I will find a man who will say something like what is inscribed on this ring. Who knows maybe I will find him and maybe I won’t. I’m only 23, I have time.
Gold ‘posy’ ring
England, 18th century AD
British Museum
'Many are the stars I see but in my eye no star like thee'
The term ‘posy’, based on the French ‘poésy’, describes the amatory verse or rhyming motto with which the rings are engraved. Here the inscription reads: ‘Many are thee starrs I see yet in my eye no starr like thee’.
The practice of giving gold hoop rings engraved with mottoes at betrothals or weddings was common in England from the sixteenth century onwards, and continued until the late eighteenth century. ‘Posy’ rings could, however, be given on many other occasions as tokens of friendship or loyalty, and ‘posies’ are also found on religious and memorial rings. The inscription is generally found on the interior of the ring, hidden to everyone except the wearer. Most of the sentimental mottoes were taken from popular literature of the time, such as ‘chapbooks’ (pamphlets), or from collections on the language of courtship. A few customers would supply their own composition for the goldsmith to engrave.
The outside of the hoop was often decorated to enhance the message or to form part of the message itself. Coloured enamels could be used, or chased motifs, like the sixteen stars on this example. The inscriptions were usually enamelled in black, which makes them easier to read, although very few survive with all their enamel. The language and the style of the inscription helps us to date them.
S. Bury, An introduction to sentimental (London, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1985)
C. Oman, British rings 800-1914 (London, Batsford, 1974)
O.M. Dalton, Catalogue of the finger rings, (London, British Museum, 1912)
J. Evans, English posies and posy rings (Oxford University Press, 1931)

ornamentedbeing:

I’m sure someone will reblog this and be negative about it but I don’t really care. My mother is a strong woman and I am proud to take after her. She raised me to be very independent and it’s one of the reasons I was able to say farewell to my home and move to London alone. I have always known that if I was ever trapped in a tower I wouldn’t need a prince to rescue me, I can save myself.

That said I hope that one day I will find a man who will say something like what is inscribed on this ring. Who knows maybe I will find him and maybe I won’t. I’m only 23, I have time.

Gold ‘posy’ ring

England, 18th century AD

British Museum

'Many are the stars I see but in my eye no star like thee'

The term ‘posy’, based on the French ‘poésy’, describes the amatory verse or rhyming motto with which the rings are engraved. Here the inscription reads: ‘Many are thee starrs I see yet in my eye no starr like thee’.

The practice of giving gold hoop rings engraved with mottoes at betrothals or weddings was common in England from the sixteenth century onwards, and continued until the late eighteenth century. ‘Posy’ rings could, however, be given on many other occasions as tokens of friendship or loyalty, and ‘posies’ are also found on religious and memorial rings. The inscription is generally found on the interior of the ring, hidden to everyone except the wearer. Most of the sentimental mottoes were taken from popular literature of the time, such as ‘chapbooks’ (pamphlets), or from collections on the language of courtship. A few customers would supply their own composition for the goldsmith to engrave.

The outside of the hoop was often decorated to enhance the message or to form part of the message itself. Coloured enamels could be used, or chased motifs, like the sixteen stars on this example. The inscriptions were usually enamelled in black, which makes them easier to read, although very few survive with all their enamel. The language and the style of the inscription helps us to date them.

S. Bury, An introduction to sentimental (London, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1985)

C. Oman, British rings 800-1914 (London, Batsford, 1974)

O.M. Dalton, Catalogue of the finger rings, (London, British Museum, 1912)

J. Evans, English posies and posy rings (Oxford University Press, 1931)

(via lost-in-centuries-long-gone)

theparisreview:

Aharon Appelfeld on when he started writing. “I was very alone. No parents, no friends. I asked myself, What do I need? Why am I working in the fields? What will happen to me? Where is my life going? I had nothing. So then one day I made a list. My father, his name, Michael—I wrote that. My mother, Bunia. My grandfather, Meir Joseph. I wrote, I was born in Czernowitz and my mother was killed. This list gave me a ground I understood. I was not alone. I still had my family. They exist in me. I made myself a family on paper. I wrote it down, and they became real.”

theparisreview:

Aharon Appelfeld on when he started writing. “I was very alone. No parents, no friends. I asked myself, What do I need? Why am I working in the fields? What will happen to me? Where is my life going? I had nothing. So then one day I made a list. My father, his name, Michael—I wrote that. My mother, Bunia. My grandfather, Meir Joseph. I wrote, I was born in Czernowitz and my mother was killed. This list gave me a ground I understood. I was not alone. I still had my family. They exist in me. I made myself a family on paper. I wrote it down, and they became real.”

It is not the length of life, but the depth.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson (via observando)